Articles and Essays | Head On Photo Festival

Articles and Essays

Derby Chang: Street

Derby Chang: Street

On LA’s Pacific Coast Highway near the old Getty museum, Derby Chang first snapped an image of a pretty lady walking by with her pet pig. His first taste of real life theatre in public spaces kick-started an obsession with photography – and for capturing intriguing women – that followed him long after his return to Sydney.

Alice Sarginson: Aqua Ladies

Alice Sarginson: Aqua Ladies

When a group of inner-west women started aqua aerobics at their local pool, they had no idea that it would lead to more than just fitness – least of all, posing for a glamorous calendar.

But a cause close to their heart led them to do just that to raise funds for multiple sclerosis (MS).

The calendar depicts women styled inspired by the look of the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s in a beautiful and tasteful way.

Katrin Koenning: 10335, Blue June

KATRIN KOENNING: 10335, BLUE JUNE

(A SUB-NARRATIVE TO THE SERIES NEAR)

His parents arrive on a Monday. He has taken five weeks off so we can spend it with them. It’s been a year and five months since we last saw them. The big void between Cape Town and Melbourne doesn’t make reunions a regular occurrence. We try to anticipate nothing, to see everything, to take the days as they come. We share stories, laughter - and silence. Not all days are good. Realising our differences, we clash, mostly over silly things like maps or dishes.

Milton Rogovin’s Approach: Photography, Class, and the Aesthetics of Making Space

Milton Rogovin’s Approach: Photography, Class, and the Aesthetics of Making Space

An edited version of Joseph Entin’s paper to the American Studies Association Conference. Read the full version at americansuburbx.com.

Working closely with his wife Anne, Milton Rogovin undertook a range of projects to document people he refers to as “the forgotten ones”: workers, the poor, indigenous peoples, people of colour.

Elena Zhukova: Dreams

Elena Zhukova: Dreams

The purpose of my photographs is to illustrate the magnitude and vast range of human character and individuality in fictitious ways. I draw parallels between individuals I meet or see in real life and cartoon-type characters I envision in my fantasies. Some ideas are inspired by paintings, some are based on movies and books and some find their roots in the depth of my imagination without correlation to any of existing forms of media I know of. On the same note, I find listening and communicating with kids to be essential for my creative process.

In the Name of God: Alejandra Platt

In the Name of God: Alejandra Platt

Mexican photographer Alejandra Platt’s award-winning photography has been showcased in over 30 solo exhibitions. Now, The Embassy of Mexico in Australia and the Instituto Cervantes present her series En el Nombre de Dios (In the Name of God), showing May 6 to June 1 as part of the Head On Photography Festival.

Altered States of Agoraphobia

Altered States of Agoraphobia

UK teacher and photographer Simon Kossoff moved to America and started a blog to show others how he saw his new country. In doing so he tapped into a strong current of photographers exploring the quirks of America — and built an online culture all of his own.

Pete Eckert: Tourist in the Sighted World

Pete Eckert: Tourist in the Sighted World

I didn’t take photography seriously until I went totally blind. I was trained in sculpture and industrial design. I planned to study architecture at Yale but then I started to lose my sight. There is currently no cure for Retinitis Pigmentosa.

It took me two years to recover and figure out what to do. My two fears were how to make money and how to protect myself. I earned an MBA and a black belt in martial arts. By the time I received my degree I was nearly blind.

Portraits: Lizane Louw

Portraits: Lizane Louw

Caledon, South Africa: Mr Arnolds Plaatjies and his wife Alithea van Breda in their humble home on a farm near Caledon in the Western Cape South Africa.

During 2009 the farming communities in the Western Cape were once again under the Human Rights spotlight. Many stories were published about the poor living conditions of farm workers and questions were raised about their treatment.